Virtual Reality

High-Tech Construction Tools Earn a Checkered Flag in Modern Racetrack Design

In October 1970, Hollywood star Steve McQueen won the 17-lap Winter Sprint race in Avondale, Arizona, on a track built in 1964 to be the “Indianapolis of the West.” This is just one entry in the storied history of Arizona’s ISM Raceway (formerly Phoenix International Raceway), which remains a venerable institution in the racing world.

The racetrack started out as a 2.5-mile road course and evolved its design to keep up with racing trends; it’s now a one-mile, low-banked, tri-oval racetrack optimized for NASCAR and IndyCar events. In 2017, Raceway owners embarked on a massive, $178 million renovation that would move the start and finish lines for better visibility and add 45,000 seats to the existing grandstand, two new gate entrances, and 16 new buildings in the center of the track, including concessions, restrooms, luxury suites, elevators, escalators, and a media building.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/racetrack-design/.

Photo Credit: Okland Construction used BIM, 4D construction management, and virtual and mixed reality to renovate Arizona’s ISM Raceway. Courtesy Aaron Kes/ISM Raceway.

Post type: 

8 Construction-Technology Innovations That Changed the Game in 2017

On November 17, the UK’s Institution of Structural Engineers announced its 2017 Structural Award winners. The globe-spanning projects included a billowy football stadium roof in Bilbao, Spain; an adaptable, easily transportable stage structure for Adele’s 25 tour; and an elegant and seismically robust Bahá’í temple in Chile. As diverse as the entries are, they have an inventive artistry in common, stretching the bounds of construction technology to realize previously unbuildable visions.

Technological innovations are spreading like wildfire in all sectors. If you make your living in architecture, engineering, or construction, chances are good that something is coming on the market soon that will improve the quality, aesthetics, and profitability of your projects, as we’ve seen in these eight emerging solutions that made an impact in 2017.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/construction-technology-2017/.

Photo Credit: A Gaudí-inspired pedestrian footbridge in Madrid was constructed on-site using commercial 3D printers. Courtesy IAAC – Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia.

Redshift Categories: 
Post type: 

With MR, VR, and AR, Humans and Machines Will Unite in the Workforce

Fears about artificial intelligence and robots replacing humans, from real-world worries about job displacement to dystopian visions of subjugation, are going strong. But as the world continues to flood with data, there’s no reason for designers or engineers to panic, and many reasons to get excited. Current trends in virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and mixed reality (MR) actually have the potential to create stronger connections between people and machines.

VR (immersing yourself in a completely artificial world), AR (overlaying a digital layer of contextual information into the built environment), and MR (an interactive mix of VR and AR) are quickly gathering speed. But we’re in the early days. A lot of today’s revolutionary devices will eventually look like the first mobile phones—big bricks with coiled cords, in bulky briefcases.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/with-mr-vr-and-ar-humans-and-machines-....
Post type: 

Virtual Reality in Health Care Makes Medical Reality Easier to Endure

Few people relish a trip to the doctor or hospital, and even fewer look forward to twilight years potentially spent in an assisted-care facility. But if next-generation technologies in health care could make those experiences better, getting a whiff of that unmistakable antiseptic hospital smell might not be so bad.

Several companies exploring 3D technologies, augmented reality, and virtual reality in health care certainly hope so. Any technology or advancement in health care has two primary sets of stakeholders: the doctors/caregivers and the patients. And for 3D technologies, AR, and VR, that’s no different. For doctors and other caregivers, these technologies are driving big leaps forward in training and education. For patients, it’s all about greater engagement and enhanced healing, rehabilitation, and comfort.

Training health-care practitioners using 3D imagery is highly effective, as medical-imaging pioneer Dr. Maki Sugimoto and others have found. After all, 3D models are more effective than pictures in a textbook, because students can move and explore the models as they would real cadavers—without the mess.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/virtual-reality-in-health-care/.

Photo Credit: Courtesy Rendever

Post type: 
Subscribe to RSS - Virtual Reality