Team Management

Japan’s Daiwa House Industry Is Using Generative Design to Retool Urban Housing

Japan is one of the most urbanized nations in the world, with more than 91 percent of its citizens living in its densely packed cities. High demand for long-term housing in urban areas combined with a scarcity of available land presents unique challenges for Japan’s residential-construction industry—challenges that are difficult to overcome using traditional design methods. To this end, Daiwa House Industry, one of Japan’s largest construction firms and a specialist in industrialized housing, is developing custom systems that use generative design to optimize building on small parcels, in line with the country’s urbanization patterns.

In Japan’s housing-complex business, plans are drawn up manually to demonstrate how the building can make best use of the landowner’s property; with such limited space on the island nation, maximizing efficiency is crucial. “For housing complexes such as apartment blocks, it is very important that we lay out the building on the available land,” says Takashi Yamasaki, manager of Daiwa’s Information Systems department. The proposal must also satisfy the landowner’s commitment to contribute to the community; profits are not the sole focus.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/daiwa-house-industry/.

Photo Credit: A three-story apartment complex designed by Daiwa House. Courtesy of Daiwa House Industry.

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4 Tips for Building a Small-but-Mighty Team of BIM Experts

The architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry is the perfect embodiment of what it means to be big: towering skyscrapers, massive bridges, expansive tunnels, and innovative and inventive designs. Yet small can also be powerful, especially when it’s rooted in passion and purpose. These are the foundations on which Axoscape was built.

Based in Houston, Texas, Axoscape helps architects, contractors, and subcontractors understand BIM (Building Information Modeling) technology to stay relevant in the industry. Despite having only a nine-person team, the expert BIM-services firm is making a significant impact by taking on projects with a purpose, whether it’s laser-scan-like photogrammetry of damage from Hurricane Harvey or partnering with Habitat for Humanity, Houston Food Bank, and other organizations supporting their communities.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/bim-expert/.

Photo Credit: When tackling complex issues, it’s essential to bring diverse perspectives and skillsets to the table. Image composite: Micke Tong.

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5 Ways Industrial-Manufacturing “Dinosaur” Claudius Peters Staves Off Extinction

Claudius Peters is hardly a household name. The huge manufacturer of materials handling and processing systems for cement, gypsum, steel, and aluminum plants won’t challenge Amazon’s or Tesla’s news-cycle dominance. But Thomas Nagel, the company’s chief digital officer and operations director, is establishing Claudius Peters as a global leader in—of all things—digital innovation.

Founded in 1906 and headquartered in Buxtehude, Germany, near Hamburg, Claudius Peters and is an international company with a dozen offices worldwide. Scale and longevity are reassuring. “But 100 years of operation also means that we are a dinosaur,” Nagel says. That presents a fundamental challenge: How does a “dinosaur” avoid extinction?

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/claudius-peters/.

Photo Credit: Courtesy Claudius Peters

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The Time Is Now to Inspire a New Generation of Women in Construction

The history of construction—to the best of anyone’s knowledge—goes back to the Stone Age, when stones essentially served as proto-hammers. Hard stones were used to break softer stones, blacksmithing surfaced, metal nails appeared, and stuff got built. Roughly two million years later, the hammer handle was invented, followed by forging, ironwork, and the Industrial Revolution, thus giving birth to construction as we know it—which has largely remained a male-dominated industry.

While construction still evokes images of sweaty men in hard hats, the notion that the industry is—and will always be—a boys’ club is fading fast. A significant disparity in the ratio of men to women in construction persists, but a big shift is underway.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/women-in-construction/.

Photo Credit: Construction has long been a male-dominated industry—but a big shift is underway. Courtesy Miron Construction.

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The Real Life of a Machine-Tool Design Manager: Precihole’s Prolific Azhar Qazi

Precihole’s website dubs Azhar Qazi the “next generation” to lead the machine-tool company. The son of cofounder A.A. Qazi, he fully intended to jump into the design and development end of the family business. But Qazi soon realized that his role at Precihole Machine Tools, one of India’s leaders in deep-hole-drilling solutions, would require much more than machine design.

Precihole Machine Tools serves the engineering needs of diverse industries, including defense, aerospace, oil, and medical. When Qazi came on board, a high turnover rate and a general lack of marketing knowledge within the company were inhibiting Precihole from moving forward. So after putting in a full day’s work, Qazi would stay up all night watching YouTube tutorials for programs like CorelDRAW and Adobe Illustrator to create brochures and other marketing collateral on his own.

But Qazi didn’t stop there: When the website needed a redesign, he took that on. And when prospective customers needed a better way to view products, he taught himself animation so he could make illustrative videos. “I could not limit myself to learning in a few areas of machine design,” Qazi says. “I always keep on finding what new technologies are available—3D printing, virtual reality, augmented reality, and so on. I find out all this from YouTube and then apply it to my organization.”

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/machine-tool-design/.

Photo Credit: Images Courtesy Precihole Sports

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