The Real Life

The Real Life of a Machine-Tool Design Manager: Precihole’s Prolific Azhar Qazi

Precihole’s website dubs Azhar Qazi the “next generation” to lead the machine-tool company. The son of cofounder A.A. Qazi, he fully intended to jump into the design and development end of the family business. But Qazi soon realized that his role at Precihole Machine Tools, one of India’s leaders in deep-hole-drilling solutions, would require much more than machine design.

Precihole Machine Tools serves the engineering needs of diverse industries, including defense, aerospace, oil, and medical. When Qazi came on board, a high turnover rate and a general lack of marketing knowledge within the company were inhibiting Precihole from moving forward. So after putting in a full day’s work, Qazi would stay up all night watching YouTube tutorials for programs like CorelDRAW and Adobe Illustrator to create brochures and other marketing collateral on his own.

But Qazi didn’t stop there: When the website needed a redesign, he took that on. And when prospective customers needed a better way to view products, he taught himself animation so he could make illustrative videos. “I could not limit myself to learning in a few areas of machine design,” Qazi says. “I always keep on finding what new technologies are available—3D printing, virtual reality, augmented reality, and so on. I find out all this from YouTube and then apply it to my organization.”

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/machine-tool-design/.

Photo Credit: Images Courtesy Precihole Sports

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The Real Life of a Virtual Construction Engineer: Sundt’s Eric Cylwik Gets Visual

When it comes to construction companies, Sundt has a serious foothold in every arena, from mining and industrial to commercial, government, and health care contracts. Working at such a large scale—and with the potential impacts of, say, something like a major bridge project—Sundt has recognized virtual construction as essential to increasing productivity and minimizing risk.

Enter Eric Cylwik, a virtual construction engineer who works within Sundt’s transportation group. Cylwik is a Building Information Modeling (BIM) wizard who graduated from Arizona State University. “My degree is in design studies with an emphasis in digital visualization,” Cylwik says. “The idea behind the degree was that students would study design, then take 3D digital art classes to help visualize design concepts.”

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/virtual-construction-engineer/.

Photo Credit: Images Courtesy Sundt and Eric Cylwik

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The Real Life of a Precision Machinist: Swissomation’s Christian Welch Talks Tiny

In manufacturing, the little details often have the biggest impact. So when you’re a precision machinist, and your job is to manufacture parts that can sit atop a dime and still seem small, an eye for minutia is essential.

Christian Welch owns and operates Swissomation, a precision manufacturing business with offices in Virginia and Texas. It’s a job he’s held for two decades, in the business his family has been in for 70 years. Welch’s company micromachines tiny parts using Swiss-type CNC machines. Highly valued for precision applications—from electronics to aerospace—Swiss-type machines can make small complex parts faster and better than conventional CNC lathes. They can also perform simultaneous operations, employ 20 or more tools, and produce superior products.

Although Welch’s office is about 100 feet from the front door of his house, he rarely gets to pop back home for a coffee and eats lunch at his desk most days. “I feel like I’m always behind,” he admits. But running a machine shop in 2017 is no easy task; it seems like every year, Welch sees more machining companies shut down, victims to the financial allure of overseas manufacturing.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/precision-machinist/.

Photo Credit: Images Courtesy Swissomation

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