Product Design

Generative Design Accelerates the BAC Mono Street-Legal Race Car Into the Future

What’s one of the most effective ways to make a car go faster? Slash its weight in half.

The BAC Mono is a stripped-down street-legal supercar that weighs a slight 570 kilograms, less than half of a Toyota Corolla. The interior is pared down to a single seat and has an ultralight carbon-fiber chassis. The car’s newest iteration—which was unveiled at the BAC Innovation Centre in Liverpool, England—sheds an additional 4.8 kilograms by using generatively designed wheels made with software that maximizes strength-to-weight ratios. Dropping that extra weight could spark a revolution in automotive design and manufacturing, dramatically altering the performance and appearance of cars.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/mono-car/.

Photo Credit: The new version of the Briggs Automotive Company (BAC) Mono was just unveiled in Liverpool, England. Courtesy of PaulHPhoto.

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In Case You Missed ’Em: 6 Examples of Generative Design in Manufacturing

In just a few short years, generative design has taken the manufacturing industry by storm.

Thanks to its ability to both produce never-seen-before designs and reimagine existing items in lighter and more efficient ways, manufacturers of all sizes have been using generative design increasingly for everything from heavy machinery to safety harnesses. Although the technology is still fairly nascent, its promise is revolutionary, and the industry is taking note in cool and surprising ways.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/generative-manufacturing/.

Photo Credit: The fruits of generative design seen in one of the wheels from the retrofitted 1962 VW Bus. Courtesy of Volkswagen Innovation & Engineering Center California.

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Children With Cerebral Palsy Get in Step With Trexo Robotics’ New Walking Device

Cerebral palsy (CP) affects 500,000 children in the United States alone and is the most common childhood motor disability, according to the CDC. One common side effect is limited walking ability. If children with CP don’t undergo regular physical therapy to make sure their muscles stay worked, painful muscle contractions and deformities can ensue. When one of his family members had a child diagnosed with CP, Manmeet Maggu was inspired to tackle this problem head-on with his friend and former classmate, Rahul Udasi. Together they formed Trexo Robotics to build a robotic walking device that is now being tested in homes with families. Watch the video to learn more about how Maggu and Udasi developed this groundbreaking device with the help of rapid prototyping.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/trexo-robotics/.
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How One Company Is 3D Printing Jewelry to Celebrate Women in Tech

Today’s digital experiences rely heavily on user-interface elements. From buttons, cursors, and icons to scroll bars, sliders, and toggles, these carefully coded components allow you to click, drag, drop, load, and zoom your way to the digital world.

As a user-interface designer, Amelia Diggle is well-versed in improving the digital experience. Now, she’s bringing these digital experiences to life through Human Interface Jewellery, a New Zealand–based company that uses 3D printing to produce made-to-order jewelry inspired by user-interface elements. Diggle’s line includes fun and edgy pieces made of gold, silver, and titanium—cursor earrings, kinetic toggle rings to fiddle with, and kinetic scroll-bar necklaces you can scroll up or down to your heart’s content.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/3d-printing-jewelry/.

Photo Credit: New Zealand’s Human Interface Jewellery produces made-to-order 3D-printed jewelry inspired by user interface icons. Courtesy Human Interface Jewellery/Amelia Diggle.

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Thrashing the Future of Design With Topology Optimization and Skateboard Trucks

When it comes to skateboarding, flips and grabs are cool—but downhill longboarding is completely insane. Reaching speeds of more than 90 miles per hour, downhill longboarders combine skateboarding and surfing in an adrenaline blast that is all about speed. Clearly, keeping the wheels attached to the board is critical to these downhill daredevils.

The “truck” of a skateboard is that piece on the underside of the deck that the wheels are attached to. Made of axles, bushes, and pins, the truck is the interface between the wheels and deck that gives the rider the necessary control through shifts in weight, bending and reacting to the board’s travel. It’s a pretty important part, to say the least.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/skateboard-trucks-topology-optimization/.

Photo Credit: All of the lattice beams in Philipp Manger’s skateboard truck are less than 1 millimeter wide. Courtesy Philipp Manger.

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No Grown-Ups Allowed: woom’s Lightweight Bikes Are Just for Kids

When a couple finds out they’re expecting a child, it’s not unusual for them to rush out and fill their home with little shoes, little clothes, little toys. When woom Bikes cofounder Christian Bezdeka found out his wife was expecting their first child, he went on another mission: to find the perfect little bike.

However, the Austrian designer returned empty-handed, finding that many of the existing options for kids were less than stellar. Undeterred, he went to work creating his own kid’s bike.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/woom-bikes/.
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A Bionic Man: Hugh Herr Strides Forward on Next-Generation Robotic Legs

You’ll likely hear Hugh Herr before you see him.

The charismatic leader of MIT’s biomechatronics research group wears two next-generation prosthetic legs, each barely visible under the cuff of his gray slacks, which produce a faint percussive buzz with each footfall, like the sound of a tiny electric drill. The sound serves almost as a leitmotif—you hear it, faintly, as he ascends the stairs to his office in the glass-and-metal MIT Media Lab or as he ambles across the stage during a lecture.

Among futurists, Herr’s story is the stuff of legend. In the early 1980s, after he lost both legs below the knees to frostbite in a climbing accident in New Hampshire’s White Mountains, a doctor told him he would never climb again. Defiant, Herr used a local machine shop to hack together custom prostheses from rubber, metal, and wood. He designed a set of small feet that could find a foothold where his old pair would have slipped and a spiked set he could use to ascend the steepest walls of ice. He went on to become as confident a climber after his accident as he’d ever been before.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/hugh-herr-robotic-legs/.

Photo Credit: Hugh Herr. Courtesy MIT Media Lab.

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Robo-Cycling: Bringing the Power of Automation to Recycling

Horowitz’s path to robotics wasn’t obvious from the beginning. As he tells it, he was convinced that getting an MBA and working in business was going to be the direction his life took. He remembers thinking, “Oh, this kind of stuff is kind of silly and kind of pointless, so I’m going to go do the adult thing. Maybe get an MBA.”

These experiences, seemingly random and unconnected, collectively combined to create a set of experiences that launched AMP Robotics.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/amp-robotics/.
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5 Ways Designers and Engineers Can Start Designing for Climate Change

Most people don’t see themselves as having the personal power or influence to make a compelling difference in climate change.

But so many of the design decisions made every day have a climate implication; each one can help promote a low-carbon future that doesn’t rely on fossil fuels. Those who create the products and built environments of everyday life—from mechanical engineers to architects—have an important role to play by designing for climate change.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/designing-for-climate-change/.

Photo Credit: Image composite: Brandon Au

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Inside My Design Mind: Stephen D. Ambrose, Savior of Rock Stars’ Hearing

Stephen D. Ambrose has some unfinished business—and it all started when he was just a kid.

What he did, you see, was something that some might consider teenage rebellion, a kid acting out against his classically trained musician father who forbade rock and folk music during Ambrose’s formative teenage years of the mid-1960s in Nashville, Tennessee.

One day, at the ripe age of 13, Ambrose hacked together an earpiece from an old crystal AM radio set and invented the world’s first wireless in-ear monitor. He did it so he could hear himself play guitar and sing—and his father was none the wiser. Now, in-ear monitors are endemic at almost any musical event so that performers can hear themselves sing.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/stephen-d-ambrose/.

Photo Credit: Ambrose (right) with Stevie Wonder. Courtesy Stephen D. Ambrose.

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