Makers

Distributed Manufacturing Gives Small Businesses a Shot at the Big Time

Automated manufacturing: It’s a term that conjures gigantic factories churning out thousands of identical products, often owned by multinational conglomerates for whom agility is a major (and expensive) undertaking.

But what about small businesses? They can pivot quickly in response to markets, but how can they access the economic efficiency that automation offers? Enter distributed manufacturing, in which the materials and fabrication are decentralized, making the processes more accessible, customizable, and affordable.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/distributed-manufacturing/.

Photo Credit: Betsy and Mike Jasper of Tarkka have the mission to democratize digital fabrication for everyone, from small-manufacturing professionals to students and hobbyists. Courtesy of Gabriel Joffe.

Post type: 

Could a Synthetic Brain Make Manufacturing Automation Accessible for All?

Imagine a future in which anyone with a dream can easily turn it into a physical product. In that future, all you need to make the dream real is to communicate what you want through words. You don’t need an engineering degree or a background in industrial design or manufacturing, just an idea.

This can (and will) happen, but first, some things need to change—starting with access to manufacturing automation.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/synthetic-brain/.

Photo Credit: Image composite: Micke Tong

Post type: 

How One Company Is 3D Printing Jewelry to Celebrate Women in Tech

Today’s digital experiences rely heavily on user-interface elements. From buttons, cursors, and icons to scroll bars, sliders, and toggles, these carefully coded components allow you to click, drag, drop, load, and zoom your way to the digital world.

As a user-interface designer, Amelia Diggle is well-versed in improving the digital experience. Now, she’s bringing these digital experiences to life through Human Interface Jewellery, a New Zealand–based company that uses 3D printing to produce made-to-order jewelry inspired by user-interface elements. Diggle’s line includes fun and edgy pieces made of gold, silver, and titanium—cursor earrings, kinetic toggle rings to fiddle with, and kinetic scroll-bar necklaces you can scroll up or down to your heart’s content.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/3d-printing-jewelry/.

Photo Credit: New Zealand’s Human Interface Jewellery produces made-to-order 3D-printed jewelry inspired by user interface icons. Courtesy Human Interface Jewellery/Amelia Diggle.

Post type: 

Layers of Innovation: A 3D-Printing Timeline

It’s hard to believe, but 3D printing has been around for almost 40 years. From Hideo Kodama’s vision for a rapid-prototyping system to the invention of the Darwin 3D printer, this video highlights the major milestones in the 3D-printing timeline that have brought the technology to where it is today.

_____

What’s almost 40 years old but looks brand new?

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/3d-printing-timeline/.
Post type: 

8 Construction-Technology Innovations That Changed the Game in 2017

On November 17, the UK’s Institution of Structural Engineers announced its 2017 Structural Award winners. The globe-spanning projects included a billowy football stadium roof in Bilbao, Spain; an adaptable, easily transportable stage structure for Adele’s 25 tour; and an elegant and seismically robust Bahá’í temple in Chile. As diverse as the entries are, they have an inventive artistry in common, stretching the bounds of construction technology to realize previously unbuildable visions.

Technological innovations are spreading like wildfire in all sectors. If you make your living in architecture, engineering, or construction, chances are good that something is coming on the market soon that will improve the quality, aesthetics, and profitability of your projects, as we’ve seen in these eight emerging solutions that made an impact in 2017.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/construction-technology-2017/.

Photo Credit: A Gaudí-inspired pedestrian footbridge in Madrid was constructed on-site using commercial 3D printers. Courtesy IAAC – Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia.

Redshift Categories: 
Post type: 
Subscribe to RSS - Makers