Industrial Design

Distributed Manufacturing Gives Small Businesses a Shot at the Big Time

Automated manufacturing: It’s a term that conjures gigantic factories churning out thousands of identical products, often owned by multinational conglomerates for whom agility is a major (and expensive) undertaking.

But what about small businesses? They can pivot quickly in response to markets, but how can they access the economic efficiency that automation offers? Enter distributed manufacturing, in which the materials and fabrication are decentralized, making the processes more accessible, customizable, and affordable.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/distributed-manufacturing/.

Photo Credit: Betsy and Mike Jasper of Tarkka have the mission to democratize digital fabrication for everyone, from small-manufacturing professionals to students and hobbyists. Courtesy of Gabriel Joffe.

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Manufacturing “Living Metals” With Cold-Spray Technology Is Rocket Science

The promise of metal additive manufacturing hasn’t quite matched its initial hype. Costs are still high, and the tech remains best suited to fabricating low-volume, high-complexity parts. In short, it hasn’t been the anticipated boon to industrial manufacturing yet—so using a rocket engine to spray and bond metal particles onto existing machine parts might seem a little like overkill.

A Bay Area trio with a unique start-up idea may be changing all that. Co-founder engineers Deepak Atyam, Alex Finch, and Jesse Lang of Tri-D Dynamics have developed what they call “cold metal fusion,” which combines powder-based metallurgy with rocket science—and perhaps will open an untapped market in the process.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/cold-spray-technology/.

Photo Credit: The Tri-D Dynamics TerraForma machine uses a small rocket engine and heated nitrogen to project metal powder at supersonic speeds. Courtesy of Tri-D Dynamics.

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Generative Design Holds the Key to the Future of Cool, Fuel-Efficient Car Design

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Volkswagen Innovation & Engineering Center California, the company’s team of designers, engineers, and scientists wanted to do something memorable to represent Volkswagen’s DNA while pushing the future of car design forward. So the team brought the past and the future together by taking a classic 1962 VW Bus and retrofitting it with the latest technology, including generatively designed elements such as wheel rims and wing-mirror arms. Watch the process of bringing a retro icon into the digital age using generative-design technology.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/future-car-design/.
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Reimagining the Future of Making: Automation Helps People Live and Work Better

Humanity inevitably needs, desires, and demands more. At the same time, it must also confront the reality of less—fewer natural resources, less space, and fewer skilled construction and manufacturing workers than the world needs.

But while resources and skilled labor are in short supply, the global population is increasing (to nearly 10 billion people by 2050), and poverty is declining in developing countries. In 1990, less than a quarter of the world’s population earned enough to be defined as middle class. Today, nearly half do, and every day, 400,000 more people join the global middle class.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/future-of-automation/.
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No Grown-Ups Allowed: woom’s Lightweight Bikes Are Just for Kids

When a couple finds out they’re expecting a child, it’s not unusual for them to rush out and fill their home with little shoes, little clothes, little toys. When woom Bikes cofounder Christian Bezdeka found out his wife was expecting their first child, he went on another mission: to find the perfect little bike.

However, the Austrian designer returned empty-handed, finding that many of the existing options for kids were less than stellar. Undeterred, he went to work creating his own kid’s bike.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/woom-bikes/.
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5 Ways Designers and Engineers Can Start Designing for Climate Change

Most people don’t see themselves as having the personal power or influence to make a compelling difference in climate change.

But so many of the design decisions made every day have a climate implication; each one can help promote a low-carbon future that doesn’t rely on fossil fuels. Those who create the products and built environments of everyday life—from mechanical engineers to architects—have an important role to play by designing for climate change.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/designing-for-climate-change/.

Photo Credit: Image composite: Brandon Au

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Blackbird Guitars Unifies Sound and Manufacturing Vision With Ekoa “Wood”

Inspiration comes in many guises: a glimpse of an old photo, a ray of sunlight on the skin—or the crash of a digital watch against a concrete wall, which was the childhood inspiration for industrial designer Joseph Luttwak. Although the watch did not survive, his budding interest in making things that last did.

Based in San Francisco, Luttwak is the founder of Blackbird Guitars and Lingrove, a biocomposite-materials company. And the things he builds are lightweight, great-sounding instruments.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/blackbird-guitars/.

Photo Credit: Blackbird Guitars’ El Capitan on a bed of Ekoa. Courtesy Blackbird Guitars.

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Escobar Technologies’ Medical Simulator Is a Real Disrupter

The U.S. health-care system is as complicated and intricate as it has ever been. As the demand on the medical-care system weighs heavier with each passing year, the need for properly trained nurses, doctors, specialists, and health-care technicians continues to grow. Increasingly, these professionals are turning to medical simulators for that training.

A medical simulator can be as simple as a simulated body part, say an arm, or as complex as a simulated human patient—these educational devices are used in hospitals, universities, and medical simulation centers.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/medical-simulator/.

Photo Credit: The finished intravenous-arm simulator prototype. Courtesy Escobar Technologies.

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