Collaboration

4 Tips for Building a Small-but-Mighty Team of BIM Experts

The architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry is the perfect embodiment of what it means to be big: towering skyscrapers, massive bridges, expansive tunnels, and innovative and inventive designs. Yet small can also be powerful, especially when it’s rooted in passion and purpose. These are the foundations on which Axoscape was built.

Based in Houston, Texas, Axoscape helps architects, contractors, and subcontractors understand BIM (Building Information Modeling) technology to stay relevant in the industry. Despite having only a nine-person team, the expert BIM-services firm is making a significant impact by taking on projects with a purpose, whether it’s laser-scan-like photogrammetry of damage from Hurricane Harvey or partnering with Habitat for Humanity, Houston Food Bank, and other organizations supporting their communities.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/bim-expert/.

Photo Credit: When tackling complex issues, it’s essential to bring diverse perspectives and skillsets to the table. Image composite: Micke Tong.

Post type: 

Project Frog Envisions a Construction Industry Defined by Big Data

In this Q&A series, Redshift speaks with leaders, innovators, entrepreneurs, and disrupters who embody the future of making in construction, manufacturing, architecture, and infrastructure. This “Voices on the Future of Making” features Mike Eggers, vice president of Product and Innovation at Project Frog. The San Francisco–based industrialized-construction company designs and develops prefabricated building systems kits containing parts to be used in conjunction with a technology platform, delivering building solutions at scale.

Frog’s kits, the brainchildren of architects, product designers, and engineers, address three overarching concepts: flexibility, automation, and “accessibility,” meaning ease of use for architects, engineers, manufacturers, and builders. Similar to modular construction, these kits are assembled into schools, community centers, medical office buildings, and other structures. But while modular construction is fully assembled in a factory, the kits are designed for two-dimensional, flat-packed shipment to construction sites—like IKEA furniture but on a much larger scale.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/project-frog/.

Photo Credit: Project Frog designs prefabricated building systems as “kits” that are shipped to jobsites in flat packs. Courtesy Project Frog.

Post type: 

High-Tech Construction Tools Earn a Checkered Flag in Modern Racetrack Design

In October 1970, Hollywood star Steve McQueen won the 17-lap Winter Sprint race in Avondale, Arizona, on a track built in 1964 to be the “Indianapolis of the West.” This is just one entry in the storied history of Arizona’s ISM Raceway (formerly Phoenix International Raceway), which remains a venerable institution in the racing world.

The racetrack started out as a 2.5-mile road course and evolved its design to keep up with racing trends; it’s now a one-mile, low-banked, tri-oval racetrack optimized for NASCAR and IndyCar events. In 2017, Raceway owners embarked on a massive, $178 million renovation that would move the start and finish lines for better visibility and add 45,000 seats to the existing grandstand, two new gate entrances, and 16 new buildings in the center of the track, including concessions, restrooms, luxury suites, elevators, escalators, and a media building.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/racetrack-design/.

Photo Credit: Okland Construction used BIM, 4D construction management, and virtual and mixed reality to renovate Arizona’s ISM Raceway. Courtesy Aaron Kes/ISM Raceway.

Post type: 

Generative Design in Architecture and Construction Will Pave the Way to Productivity

In the new era of generative design in architecture, engineering, and construction, designers and builders will use computers not just to describe buildings, but cocreate them.

Before GPS, if you got lost while driving your car, you had to swallow your pride and stop to ask for directions. With the help of the innate intelligence of Google Maps or Waze, you can let a machine compute the best route so you can concentrate on what’s really important—driving.

In the case of architects, engineers, and contractors, their computers will help navigate the design and construction process, so they can focus on making successful projects and great buildings as a result.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/generative-design-architecture/.

Photo Credit: In the age of generative design, humans and computers manipulate building data to cocreate structures that could not have been conceived or built by traditional methods, such as the acoustic ceiling in the University of Iowa’s Voxman School of Music ...

Post type: 

C40’s Women4Climate Sheds Feminine Light on Major Cities’ Climate Strategies

Modern cities are built atop the designs of decades—or even centuries—past, long before the current dilemmas of rapid population growth, chronic traffic congestion, and climate change had ever been considered. Most city planning is also absent the universal design principles that take into greater account the needs of women, ethnic minorities, and elderly or disabled citizenry.

Take, for example, Houston, a city that experienced devastating flooding when Hurricane Harvey hit in 2017. Much of the city’s infrastructure predated modern capabilities, and the result was a stark reminder that most cities aren’t prepared to face the severe weather events happening more frequently with climate change. That was especially true for Houston’s most vulnerable communities, which disproportionately faced higher flood risk.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/c40-cities/.

Photo Credit: The C40 coalition shares knowledge, technology, and other innovations among 96 major global cities, such as Vancouver, Canada, to promote measurable action on climate change.

Redshift Categories: 
Post type: 

UNHCR Site Architects Use Technology to Help Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh

As Rohingya refugees flood into Bangladesh, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees works tirelessly to provide safe shelter, quickly. In this video, meet site architect Phoebe Goodwin and learn how she uses technology to make the most of the land provided for the settlement. From navigating dramatic land undulations to considering migration patterns of endangered elephants, the challenges of Goodwin’s job are varied, and she explains how she is able to tackle them all through software.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/rohingya-refugees-in-bangladesh/.
Post type: 

Want to Change the World Through Innovation in Engineering? Use a Proven System

As someone who has worked in Silicon Valley for 20-plus years, you might expect me to tout the computer as the greatest engineering innovation of all time. But even after decades working in the cradle of one of the most significant inventions in history, I still often jump back several centuries when asked what I consider to be the greatest innovation of all time: the printing press.

The printing press was instrumental in democratizing and dispersing literacy and knowledge throughout Europe and around the globe. The Gutenberg Bible, created using some of the earliest printing presses, changed the structure of politics and religion around Europe. It was revolutionary. It changed the world. That’s the power of innovation—or, at least, the possibility.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/engineering-innovation/.
Post type: 

The Time Is Now to Inspire a New Generation of Women in Construction

The history of construction—to the best of anyone’s knowledge—goes back to the Stone Age, when stones essentially served as proto-hammers. Hard stones were used to break softer stones, blacksmithing surfaced, metal nails appeared, and stuff got built. Roughly two million years later, the hammer handle was invented, followed by forging, ironwork, and the Industrial Revolution, thus giving birth to construction as we know it—which has largely remained a male-dominated industry.

While construction still evokes images of sweaty men in hard hats, the notion that the industry is—and will always be—a boys’ club is fading fast. A significant disparity in the ratio of men to women in construction persists, but a big shift is underway.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/women-in-construction/.

Photo Credit: Construction has long been a male-dominated industry—but a big shift is underway. Courtesy Miron Construction.

Redshift Categories: 
Post type: 

What’s Your Rocket Fuel? Staying Motivated as an Engineer

What propels you from your bed each morning and into the office? What motivates you to work late to complete a task? What energizes you at work? In short, what’s your rocket fuel?

I am fascinated by what motivates people, especially engineers. This is more than a casual curiosity; as a leader, it is my job to understand what motivates my team. Given the diversity of Autodesk’s talented and dedicated employees, there is fertile ground to explore.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/staying-motivated-as-an-engineer/.
Post type: 

The Future of Education Will Determine the Success of Tomorrow’s Workforce

In the midst of today’s fast-moving, tech-heavy landscape, sit back and ask yourself an important question: How does your degree and formal education impact what you’re doing in your work life?

This question gets to the heart of the immediate need for a foundational shift in how academia and industry operate—and need to cooperate—for the future of education. In a world of information, the United States’ Industrial-era education system is showing its age. To meet the demands of a new era, learning needs to be a fundamental obligation of citizenship. Education isn’t about majors anymore; it’s about missions.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/future-of-education/.

Photo Credit: Image composite: Micke Tong

Redshift Categories: 
Post type: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Collaboration