BIM

4 Tips for Building a Small-but-Mighty Team of BIM Experts

The architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry is the perfect embodiment of what it means to be big: towering skyscrapers, massive bridges, expansive tunnels, and innovative and inventive designs. Yet small can also be powerful, especially when it’s rooted in passion and purpose. These are the foundations on which Axoscape was built.

Based in Houston, Texas, Axoscape helps architects, contractors, and subcontractors understand BIM (Building Information Modeling) technology to stay relevant in the industry. Despite having only a nine-person team, the expert BIM-services firm is making a significant impact by taking on projects with a purpose, whether it’s laser-scan-like photogrammetry of damage from Hurricane Harvey or partnering with Habitat for Humanity, Houston Food Bank, and other organizations supporting their communities.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/bim-expert/.

Photo Credit: When tackling complex issues, it’s essential to bring diverse perspectives and skillsets to the table. Image composite: Micke Tong.

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The Real Life of a Virtual Construction Engineer: Sundt’s Eric Cylwik Gets Visual

When it comes to construction companies, Sundt has a serious foothold in every arena, from mining and industrial to commercial, government, and health care contracts. Working at such a large scale—and with the potential impacts of, say, something like a major bridge project—Sundt has recognized virtual construction as essential to increasing productivity and minimizing risk.

Enter Eric Cylwik, a virtual construction engineer who works within Sundt’s transportation group. Cylwik is a Building Information Modeling (BIM) wizard who graduated from Arizona State University. “My degree is in design studies with an emphasis in digital visualization,” Cylwik says. “The idea behind the degree was that students would study design, then take 3D digital art classes to help visualize design concepts.”

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/virtual-construction-engineer/.

Photo Credit: Images Courtesy Sundt and Eric Cylwik

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