Vision

The Future of Education Will Determine the Success of Tomorrow’s Workforce

In the midst of today’s fast-moving, tech-heavy landscape, sit back and ask yourself an important question: How does your degree and formal education impact what you’re doing in your work life?

This question gets to the heart of the immediate need for a foundational shift in how academia and industry operate—and need to cooperate—for the future of education. In a world powered by ubiquitous information, the traditional education model is showing its age. To meet the demands of a new era, lifelong learning needs to be at the center of any professional’s career plan. Education isn’t about majors anymore; it’s about future skilling to keep pace with rapid advances in technology and emerging opportunities across industries.

The days of set disciplines and skills, of hermetically sealed and siloed professions, is over. Today’s workforce, from coders to workers on the new factory floor, needs to be focused on lifetime learning and reskilling, finding ways to adapt to changing professional flows of knowledge.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://redshift.autodesk.com/future-of-education/.

Photo Credit: From grade school to college to the workplace, education is ongoing. Illustration by Micke Tong.

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Could a Synthetic Brain Make Manufacturing Automation Accessible for All?

Imagine a future in which anyone with a dream can easily turn it into a physical product. In that future, all you need to make the dream real is to communicate what you want through words. You don’t need an engineering degree or a background in industrial design or manufacturing, just an idea.

This can (and will) happen, but first, some things need to change—starting with access to manufacturing automation.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/synthetic-brain/.

Photo Credit: Image composite: Micke Tong

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Reimagining the Future of Making: Automation Helps People Live and Work Better

Humanity inevitably needs, desires, and demands more. At the same time, it must also confront the reality of less—fewer natural resources, less space, and fewer skilled construction and manufacturing workers than the world needs.

But while resources and skilled labor are in short supply, the global population is increasing (to nearly 10 billion people by 2050), and poverty is declining in developing countries. In 1990, less than a quarter of the world’s population earned enough to be defined as middle class. Today, nearly half do, and every day, 400,000 more people join the global middle class.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/future-of-automation/.
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GIS and BIM Integration Will Transform Infrastructure Design and Construction

An unfortunate fact of the AEC (architecture, engineering, and construction) industry is that, between every stage of the process—from planning and design to construction and operations—critical data is lost.

For example, when you move data between phases of the usable lifecycle of a bridge, you end up shuttling that data back and forth between software systems that recognize only their own data sets. The minute you translate that data, you reduce its richness and value. When a project stakeholder needs data from an earlier phase of the process, planners, designers, and engineers often have to manually re-create that information, resulting in unnecessary rework. 

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/gis-and-bim-integration/.

Photo Credit: Merging GIS and BIM data introduces a geospatial element into structure design, which leads to safer and smarter buildings, roads, and transportation.

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What’s Your Rocket Fuel? Staying Motivated as an Engineer

What propels you from your bed each morning and into the office? What motivates you to work late to complete a task? What energizes you at work? In short, what’s your rocket fuel?

I am fascinated by what motivates people, especially engineers. This is more than a casual curiosity; as a leader, it is my job to understand what motivates my team. Given the diversity of Autodesk’s talented and dedicated employees, there is fertile ground to explore.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/staying-motivated-as-an-engineer/.
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Why Adding Diversity in Artificial Intelligence Is Nonnegotiable

Remember those set-and-forget robot vacuum cleaners that were all the rage several years ago? In addition to being a fun (and useful) novelty, they unintentionally provided a vivid example of why diversity in artificial intelligence (AI) is essential.

One night in South Korea, where it’s common to sleep on the ground, a vacuum robot “ate” a woman’s hair while she slept. The robot had no malicious intent; it acted as it was programmed to do. But that’s just it: The implications of different cultures weren’t considered during the product-development process. Nobody asked, “Does everybody who will use this product sleep on a high bed, and what needs to be considered for those who don’t?”

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/diversity-in-artificial-intelligence/.
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With MR, VR, and AR, Humans and Machines Will Unite in the Workforce

Fears about artificial intelligence and robots replacing humans, from real-world worries about job displacement to dystopian visions of subjugation, are going strong. But as the world continues to flood with data, there’s no reason for designers or engineers to panic, and many reasons to get excited. Current trends in virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR), and mixed reality (MR) actually have the potential to create stronger connections between people and machines.

VR (immersing yourself in a completely artificial world), AR (overlaying a digital layer of contextual information into the built environment), and MR (an interactive mix of VR and AR) are quickly gathering speed. But we’re in the early days. A lot of today’s revolutionary devices will eventually look like the first mobile phones—big bricks with coiled cords, in bulky briefcases.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/with-mr-vr-and-ar-humans-and-machines-....
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New Metal Means a Wave of Additive Manufacturing Technologies (Not Limp Bizkit)

After 20 years of iteration on the same basic additive-manufacturing technologies for metal, a new wave of innovation is emerging. Lower-cost, safer processes are replacing the old ways of doing things, offering vastly different material properties through resolution, surface quality, and design freedom.

But first, a little 3D-printing history: Since the invention of the selective laser melting (SLM) process at the Fraunhofer Institute in 1995, metal additive manufacturing has relied primarily on three processes: the first, and most common, selectively melts a cross-section of a metal powder with a laser or electron beam, layer by layer, to build up a metal object in a range of alloys. The second, a lens/directed-energy approach, blows the metal powder into the path of the laser. And in the third, a powder-bed approach, the metal powders are glued together, then sintered to achieve metal-like properties.

As transformative as these processes have been in enabling custom and complex parts, they aren’t perfect: Using metal powder for additive manufacturing means handling potentially dangerous materials, and thermal-distortion issues have seen many prints relegated to the bin of broken dreams.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/additive-manufacturing-technologies/.

Photo Credit: Courtesy XJet

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Virtual Reality in Health Care Makes Medical Reality Easier to Endure

Few people relish a trip to the doctor or hospital, and even fewer look forward to twilight years potentially spent in an assisted-care facility. But if next-generation technologies in health care could make those experiences better, getting a whiff of that unmistakable antiseptic hospital smell might not be so bad.

Several companies exploring 3D technologies, augmented reality, and virtual reality in health care certainly hope so. Any technology or advancement in health care has two primary sets of stakeholders: the doctors/caregivers and the patients. And for 3D technologies, AR, and VR, that’s no different. For doctors and other caregivers, these technologies are driving big leaps forward in training and education. For patients, it’s all about greater engagement and enhanced healing, rehabilitation, and comfort.

Training health-care practitioners using 3D imagery is highly effective, as medical-imaging pioneer Dr. Maki Sugimoto and others have found. After all, 3D models are more effective than pictures in a textbook, because students can move and explore the models as they would real cadavers—without the mess.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/virtual-reality-in-health-care/.

Photo Credit: Courtesy Rendever

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