Technology

Generative Design Accelerates the BAC Mono Street-Legal Race Car Into the Future

What’s one of the most effective ways to make a car go faster? Slash its weight in half.

The BAC Mono is a stripped-down street-legal supercar that weighs a slight 570 kilograms, less than half of a Toyota Corolla. The interior is pared down to a single seat and has an ultralight carbon-fiber chassis. The car’s newest iteration—which was unveiled at the BAC Innovation Centre in Liverpool, England—sheds an additional 4.8 kilograms by using generatively designed wheels made with software that maximizes strength-to-weight ratios. Dropping that extra weight could spark a revolution in automotive design and manufacturing, dramatically altering the performance and appearance of cars.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/mono-car/.

Photo Credit: The new version of the Briggs Automotive Company (BAC) Mono was just unveiled in Liverpool, England. Courtesy of PaulHPhoto.

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Ready to Reduce Your Construction Emissions? Use the Embodied Carbon Calculator

It’s no secret that the construction industry is one of the biggest contributors of greenhouse-gas emissions. The numbers are staggering: Embodied carbon currently makes up 11% or more of global emissions; by comparison, that’s more than five times higher than the 2% of global emissions produced by the entire aviation industry.

With a projected 2.5 trillion square feet of new buildings being constructed around the world by 2060—equal to adding a New York City to the planet every 34 days for the next four decades—emissions associated with embodied carbon will skyrocket if left unchecked.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/embodied-carbon-calculator/.

Photo Credit: With new construction projected to top 2.5 trillion square feet by 2060, it’s critical to address the environmental impact of building materials now.

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Massive Hybrid Manufacturing Machine in Europe Pushes Boundaries of 3D Printing

When toy-scale 3D printers began popping up at Maker Faires about a decade ago, the idea of printing an entire house seemed a long way off. But by late 2019, builders were already producing entire neighborhoods of small printed-concrete dwellings. Clearly, 3D printing can work on a grown-up scale. But can it generate large, complex, engineered components for urban architecture or manufacturing? A consortium of corporations, universities, and nonprofits is determined to prove that it can.

Industry has focused commercial-scale additive manufacturing on products with complex geometries for which traditional milling, casting, or grinding methods—especially objects needed in small numbers, on short notice—are impractical or expensive. Generally, they’ve been fairly small objects. But Foster + Partners, a global studio for architecture, urbanism, and design, has pushed the boundaries of scale for additive manufacturing by designing and planning a 5-meter-long (16.4-foot-long) additive-steel building truss, which it produced in sections.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/hybrid-manufacturing/.

Photo Credit: The Large-scale Additive Subtractive Integrated Modular Machine (LASIMM) is a massive hybrid-manufacturing machine with metal additive and subtractive capabilities. Courtesy of LASIMM.

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5 Ways Digitalization Fosters a Collaborative Culture in Architecture

In 2017, CannonDesign broke ground by hiring Hilda Espinal as its first chief technology officer—a surprisingly uncommon position for large architecture and engineering firms.

With her background in architecture, information technology, and project management, Espinal helps the firm use technology to develop better design and stronger partnerships. This approach, she believes, leads to higher productivity, competitiveness, and profits for everyone involved in a project, from the designers to the builders to the building occupants. Firms might once have kept information close in the name of differentiation, but Espinal is seeing more of a collaborative spirit in the industry: an open-sharing environment that helps everyone start the race from farther down the track.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/collaborative-architecture/.

Photo Credit: The CannonDesign team collaborates using VR and other visualization tools. Courtesy of CannonDesign.

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Generative Design Takes Digital Urban Planning to New Heights Near Abu Dhabi

Jebel Hafeet, United Arab Emirates’ second-highest peak, towers at 4,000 feet, its ridges stretching across the garden city of Al Ain near Abu Dhabi. In 2017, the historic site—home to the Beehive Tombs, hundreds of dome-like burial sites dating back 5,000 years—was recognized as part of a national park, and in 2018, it was incorporated into the Sheikh Zayed Protected Areas Network.

Now, a development project at the foothills of Jebel Hafeet will use digital urban planning to meld old with new, with the goals of preserving and celebrating the region’s natural and cultural heritage and emphasizing connectivity and community.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/digital-urban-planning/.

Photo Credit: A rendering of The Plantations, an urban development at the base of UAE’s historic Jebel Hafeet mountain. Courtesy of GHD.

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Curves and CO2 Reduction Coexist in Chicago’s Colossal Concrete Installation

Musing on the spiritual and formal predilections of the building materials he used so masterfully, architect Louis Kahn once famously said: “You say to brick, ‘What do you want, brick?’ And brick says to you, ‘I like an arch.’ And you say to brick, ‘Look, I want one, too, but arches are expensive, and I can use a concrete lintel.’”

The Stereoform Slab pavilion, designed and fabricated for the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial, is a meditation on the ideal forms of a different material: concrete. The spirit of the installation directly addresses Kahn’s concession to material efficacy, combining arches with sculpted concrete while also demonstrating a more sustainable approach to using the material.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/concrete-co2/.

Photo Credit: The Stereoform Slab illustrates the potential for sustainable concrete-sculpting methods. Courtesy of Dave Burk/SOM.

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BIM and Automation Help Franken-Schotter Chisel Away at the Competition

The stone-production business has evolved over the years—a process that was once largely done by hand has morphed into the use of automation and new technologies such as BIM (Building Information Modeling) to stay competitive.

Franken-Schotter is a natural-stone manufacturer based in Germany that produces and delivers approximately 2 million metric tons of stone each year, extracting from its own four quarries. The company attributes its staying power—nearly 50 years in the business—to embracing new technologies and becoming a modern facility.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/frankenschotter/.

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Bogotá, Colombia’s Atrio Complex Is a Marvel of Coordinated Construction

Atrio is on the fast track to becoming the new “heart of Bogotá.” The major mixed-use development, currently in its first phase of construction, aims to help regenerate Centro Internacional, a former commercial district in Colombia’s capital city.

The project comprises two towers (44 and 67 stories, respectively) that will provide office space, a hotel, residences, public services, and retail on Avenida Caracas. The complex will also feature a large new public space—a transportation-adjacent pedestrian area expected to be used by 72,000 people every day.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/atrio-bogota/.

Photo Credit: Bogotá’s new 107,600-square-foot Atrio complex aims to help revive the capital city’s downtown. Courtesy of ARPRO Ellisdon JV.

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One Man’s Journey With Smart-Building Technology in Construction

As a kid from the projects in Boston, Jimmy Grossmann had not envisioned a future for himself where he’d become National COO of a major construction firm. But when he was 18, he had the opportunity to work on a major renovation of the housing project in which he lived—and he loved it. “I really enjoyed going to work every day and being with the 150 other craftspeople all working towards one goal,” he says.

And just as Grossmann’s career progressed in the construction industry, so has the development and use of technology for construction. Watch Grossmann, National COO of Boston-based Suffolk construction firm, discuss his career and the importance of why and how he uses smart-building technology in construction.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/smart-building-construction/.

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Manufacturing “Living Metals” With Cold-Spray Technology Is Rocket Science

The promise of metal additive manufacturing hasn’t quite matched its initial hype. Costs are still high, and the tech remains best suited to fabricating low-volume, high-complexity parts. In short, it hasn’t been the anticipated boon to industrial manufacturing yet—so using a rocket engine to spray and bond metal particles onto existing machine parts might seem a little like overkill.

A Bay Area trio with a unique start-up idea may be changing all that. Co-founder engineers Deepak Atyam, Alex Finch, and Jesse Lang of Tri-D Dynamics have developed what they call “cold metal fusion,” which combines powder-based metallurgy with rocket science—and perhaps will open an untapped market in the process.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/cold-spray-technology/.

Photo Credit: The Tri-D Dynamics TerraForma machine uses a small rocket engine and heated nitrogen to project metal powder at supersonic speeds. Courtesy of Tri-D Dynamics.

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