Redshift Video

BIM and Automation Help Franken-Schotter Chisel Away at the Competition

The stone-production business has evolved over the years—a process that was once largely done by hand has morphed into the use of automation and new technologies such as BIM (Building Information Modeling) to stay competitive.

Franken-Schotter is a natural-stone manufacturer based in Germany that produces and delivers approximately 2 million metric tons of stone each year, extracting from its own four quarries. The company attributes its staying power—nearly 50 years in the business—to embracing new technologies and becoming a modern facility.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/frankenschotter/.

Post type: 

One Man’s Journey With Smart-Building Technology in Construction

As a kid from the projects in Boston, Jimmy Grossmann had not envisioned a future for himself where he’d become National COO of a major construction firm. But when he was 18, he had the opportunity to work on a major renovation of the housing project in which he lived—and he loved it. “I really enjoyed going to work every day and being with the 150 other craftspeople all working towards one goal,” he says.

And just as Grossmann’s career progressed in the construction industry, so has the development and use of technology for construction. Watch Grossmann, National COO of Boston-based Suffolk construction firm, discuss his career and the importance of why and how he uses smart-building technology in construction.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/smart-building-construction/.

Post type: 

Generative Design Holds the Key to the Future of Cool, Fuel-Efficient Car Design

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Volkswagen Innovation & Engineering Center California, the company’s team of designers, engineers, and scientists wanted to do something memorable to represent Volkswagen’s DNA while pushing the future of car design forward. So the team brought the past and the future together by taking a classic 1962 VW Bus and retrofitting it with the latest technology, including generatively designed elements such as wheel rims and wing-mirror arms. Watch the process of bringing a retro icon into the digital age using generative-design technology.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/future-car-design/.
Post type: 

Children With Cerebral Palsy Get in Step With Trexo Robotics’ New Walking Device

Cerebral palsy (CP) affects 500,000 children in the United States alone and is the most common childhood motor disability, according to the CDC. One common side effect is limited walking ability. If children with CP don’t undergo regular physical therapy to make sure their muscles stay worked, painful muscle contractions and deformities can ensue. When one of his family members had a child diagnosed with CP, Manmeet Maggu was inspired to tackle this problem head-on with his friend and former classmate, Rahul Udasi. Together they formed Trexo Robotics to build a robotic walking device that is now being tested in homes with families. Watch the video to learn more about how Maggu and Udasi developed this groundbreaking device with the help of rapid prototyping.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/trexo-robotics/.
Post type: 

How One Company Is 3D Printing Jewelry to Celebrate Women in Tech

Today’s digital experiences rely heavily on user-interface elements. From buttons, cursors, and icons to scroll bars, sliders, and toggles, these carefully coded components allow you to click, drag, drop, load, and zoom your way to the digital world.

As a user-interface designer, Amelia Diggle is well-versed in improving the digital experience. Now, she’s bringing these digital experiences to life through Human Interface Jewellery, a New Zealand–based company that uses 3D printing to produce made-to-order jewelry inspired by user-interface elements. Diggle’s line includes fun and edgy pieces made of gold, silver, and titanium—cursor earrings, kinetic toggle rings to fiddle with, and kinetic scroll-bar necklaces you can scroll up or down to your heart’s content.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/3d-printing-jewelry/.

Photo Credit: New Zealand’s Human Interface Jewellery produces made-to-order 3D-printed jewelry inspired by user interface icons. Courtesy Human Interface Jewellery/Amelia Diggle.

Post type: 
Subscribe to RSS - Redshift Video