Infrastructure

How One German Company Is Going Full Steam Ahead With Maglev Technology

If it’s not impressive enough that magnets can force a fully loaded 30-ton train car to levitate and travel at speeds of 100 miles per hour (or more), then how about a maglev train that first flies five-plus miles above the ground on a Ukrainian cargo plane from Germany to China?

That’s what German construction and infrastructure company Max Bögl recently pulled off with its Chinese partner, Chengdu Xinzhu Road & Bridge Machinery Co. Ltd.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://redshift.autodesk.com/maglev-technology/.

Photo Credit: The first TSB series production vehicle was transported to China at the beginning of June 2020. The track went to Asia via train. Courtesy of Firmengruppe Max Bögl.

Post type: 

Fix Those Pipes! Water Infrastructure Is Key to a Fast-Flowing Industrial Economy

The hubs of American manufacturing—from shop floors and assembly lines to high-tech labs and chemical facilities—are connected by webs of rail, roads, and electrical power. In the popular imagination, the creation of physical goods requires strength and heft, a bit of blue-collar can-do attitude, and innovative technological solutions.

What’s rarely discussed, but equally important, is this sector’s need for water and how the nation’s aging network of pipes, treatment facilities, and wastewater plants provides a crucial component of the industrial economy.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://redshift.autodesk.com/water-infrastructure/.

Post type: 

What’s Good Failure? 5 Things Research Scientists Reveal About Business Resilience

In research, goals are often amorphous. Work doesn’t follow the traditional business sequence of setting time-based objectives. Instead, innovative products require open-ended exploration and experimentation. How do you reconcile the two?

I’ve found that rather than trying to tame researchers and school them on the lessons of business, you should flip the script. Provide the research department with a direct connection to the customers for whom they’re dreaming up solutions. Then, help product teams appreciate the value of failure and iteration. Finally, make sure the two are well connected throughout the journey. This mindset and organization shift will lead to better product innovation.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/business-resilience/.

Photo Credit: Illustration by Micke Tong

Post type: 

Generative Design Takes Digital Urban Planning to New Heights Near Abu Dhabi

Jebel Hafeet, United Arab Emirates’ second-highest peak, towers at 4,000 feet, its ridges stretching across the garden city of Al Ain near Abu Dhabi. In 2017, the historic site—home to the Beehive Tombs, hundreds of dome-like burial sites dating back 5,000 years—was recognized as part of a national park, and in 2018, it was incorporated into the Sheikh Zayed Protected Areas Network.

Now, a development project at the foothills of Jebel Hafeet will use digital urban planning to meld old with new, with the goals of preserving and celebrating the region’s natural and cultural heritage and emphasizing connectivity and community.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/digital-urban-planning/.

Photo Credit: A rendering of The Plantations, an urban development at the base of UAE’s historic Jebel Hafeet mountain. Courtesy of GHD.

Post type: 

GIS and BIM Integration Will Transform Infrastructure Design and Construction

An unfortunate fact of the AEC (architecture, engineering, and construction) industry is that, between every stage of the process—from planning and design to construction and operations—critical data is lost.

For example, when you move data between phases of the usable lifecycle of a bridge, you end up shuttling that data back and forth between software systems that recognize only their own data sets. The minute you translate that data, you reduce its richness and value. When a project stakeholder needs data from an earlier phase of the process, planners, designers, and engineers often have to manually re-create that information, resulting in unnecessary rework. 

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/gis-and-bim-integration/.

Photo Credit: Merging GIS and BIM data introduces a geospatial element into structure design, which leads to safer and smarter buildings, roads, and transportation.

Post type: 

Want to Change the World Through Innovation in Engineering? Use a Proven System

As someone who has worked in Silicon Valley for 20-plus years, you might expect me to tout the computer as the greatest engineering innovation of all time. But even after decades working in the cradle of one of the most significant inventions in history, I still often jump back several centuries when asked what I consider to be the greatest innovation of all time: the printing press.

The printing press was instrumental in democratizing and dispersing literacy and knowledge throughout Europe and around the globe. The Gutenberg Bible, created using some of the earliest printing presses, changed the structure of politics and religion around Europe. It was revolutionary. It changed the world. That’s the power of innovation—or, at least, the possibility.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/engineering-innovation/.
Post type: 

What’s Your Rocket Fuel? Staying Motivated as an Engineer

What propels you from your bed each morning and into the office? What motivates you to work late to complete a task? What energizes you at work? In short, what’s your rocket fuel?

I am fascinated by what motivates people, especially engineers. This is more than a casual curiosity; as a leader, it is my job to understand what motivates my team. Given the diversity of Autodesk’s talented and dedicated employees, there is fertile ground to explore.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/staying-motivated-as-an-engineer/.
Post type: 

Why Adding Diversity in Artificial Intelligence Is Nonnegotiable

Remember those set-and-forget robot vacuum cleaners that were all the rage several years ago? In addition to being a fun (and useful) novelty, they unintentionally provided a vivid example of why diversity in artificial intelligence (AI) is essential.

One night in South Korea, where it’s common to sleep on the ground, a vacuum robot “ate” a woman’s hair while she slept. The robot had no malicious intent; it acted as it was programmed to do. But that’s just it: The implications of different cultures weren’t considered during the product-development process. Nobody asked, “Does everybody who will use this product sleep on a high bed, and what needs to be considered for those who don’t?”

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/diversity-in-artificial-intelligence/.
Post type: 

The Real Life of a Virtual Construction Engineer: Sundt’s Eric Cylwik Gets Visual

When it comes to construction companies, Sundt has a serious foothold in every arena, from mining and industrial to commercial, government, and health care contracts. Working at such a large scale—and with the potential impacts of, say, something like a major bridge project—Sundt has recognized virtual construction as essential to increasing productivity and minimizing risk.

Enter Eric Cylwik, a virtual construction engineer who works within Sundt’s transportation group. Cylwik is a Building Information Modeling (BIM) wizard who graduated from Arizona State University. “My degree is in design studies with an emphasis in digital visualization,” Cylwik says. “The idea behind the degree was that students would study design, then take 3D digital art classes to help visualize design concepts.”

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/virtual-construction-engineer/.

Photo Credit: Images Courtesy Sundt and Eric Cylwik

Post type: 

5 Ways Designers and Engineers Can Start Designing for Climate Change

Most people don’t see themselves as having the personal power or influence to make a compelling difference in climate change.

But so many of the design decisions made every day have a climate implication; each one can help promote a low-carbon future that doesn’t rely on fossil fuels. Those who create the products and built environments of everyday life—from mechanical engineers to architects—have an important role to play by designing for climate change.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/designing-for-climate-change/.

Photo Credit: Image composite: Brandon Au

Post type: 
Subscribe to RSS - Infrastructure