Engineering

How One German Company Is Going Full Steam Ahead With Maglev Technology

If it’s not impressive enough that magnets can force a fully loaded 30-ton train car to levitate and travel at speeds of 100 miles per hour (or more), then how about a maglev train that first flies five-plus miles above the ground on a Ukrainian cargo plane from Germany to China?

That’s what German construction and infrastructure company Max Bögl recently pulled off with its Chinese partner, Chengdu Xinzhu Road & Bridge Machinery Co. Ltd.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://redshift.autodesk.com/maglev-technology/.

Photo Credit: The first TSB series production vehicle was transported to China at the beginning of June 2020. The track went to Asia via train. Courtesy of Firmengruppe Max Bögl.

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What’s Good Failure? 5 Things Research Scientists Reveal About Business Resilience

In research, goals are often amorphous. Work doesn’t follow the traditional business sequence of setting time-based objectives. Instead, innovative products require open-ended exploration and experimentation. How do you reconcile the two?

I’ve found that rather than trying to tame researchers and school them on the lessons of business, you should flip the script. Provide the research department with a direct connection to the customers for whom they’re dreaming up solutions. Then, help product teams appreciate the value of failure and iteration. Finally, make sure the two are well connected throughout the journey. This mindset and organization shift will lead to better product innovation.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/business-resilience/.

Photo Credit: Illustration by Micke Tong

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Generative Design Takes Digital Urban Planning to New Heights Near Abu Dhabi

Jebel Hafeet, United Arab Emirates’ second-highest peak, towers at 4,000 feet, its ridges stretching across the garden city of Al Ain near Abu Dhabi. In 2017, the historic site—home to the Beehive Tombs, hundreds of dome-like burial sites dating back 5,000 years—was recognized as part of a national park, and in 2018, it was incorporated into the Sheikh Zayed Protected Areas Network.

Now, a development project at the foothills of Jebel Hafeet will use digital urban planning to meld old with new, with the goals of preserving and celebrating the region’s natural and cultural heritage and emphasizing connectivity and community.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/digital-urban-planning/.

Photo Credit: A rendering of The Plantations, an urban development at the base of UAE’s historic Jebel Hafeet mountain. Courtesy of GHD.

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Curves and CO2 Reduction Coexist in Chicago’s Colossal Concrete Installation

Musing on the spiritual and formal predilections of the building materials he used so masterfully, architect Louis Kahn once famously said: “You say to brick, ‘What do you want, brick?’ And brick says to you, ‘I like an arch.’ And you say to brick, ‘Look, I want one, too, but arches are expensive, and I can use a concrete lintel.’”

The Stereoform Slab pavilion, designed and fabricated for the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial, is a meditation on the ideal forms of a different material: concrete. The spirit of the installation directly addresses Kahn’s concession to material efficacy, combining arches with sculpted concrete while also demonstrating a more sustainable approach to using the material.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/concrete-co2/.

Photo Credit: The Stereoform Slab illustrates the potential for sustainable concrete-sculpting methods. Courtesy of Dave Burk/SOM.

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Bogotá, Colombia’s Atrio Complex Is a Marvel of Coordinated Construction

Atrio is on the fast track to becoming the new “heart of Bogotá.” The major mixed-use development, currently in its first phase of construction, aims to help regenerate Centro Internacional, a former commercial district in Colombia’s capital city.

The project comprises two towers (44 and 67 stories, respectively) that will provide office space, a hotel, residences, public services, and retail on Avenida Caracas. The complex will also feature a large new public space—a transportation-adjacent pedestrian area expected to be used by 72,000 people every day.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/atrio-bogota/.

Photo Credit: Bogotá’s new 107,600-square-foot Atrio complex aims to help revive the capital city’s downtown. Courtesy of ARPRO Ellisdon JV.

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Japan’s Daiwa House Industry Is Using Generative Design to Retool Urban Housing

Japan is one of the most urbanized nations in the world, with more than 91 percent of its citizens living in its densely packed cities. High demand for long-term housing in urban areas combined with a scarcity of available land presents unique challenges for Japan’s residential-construction industry—challenges that are difficult to overcome using traditional design methods. To this end, Daiwa House Industry, one of Japan’s largest construction firms and a specialist in industrialized housing, is developing custom systems that use generative design to optimize building on small parcels, in line with the country’s urbanization patterns.

In Japan’s housing-complex business, plans are drawn up manually to demonstrate how the building can make best use of the landowner’s property; with such limited space on the island nation, maximizing efficiency is crucial. “For housing complexes such as apartment blocks, it is very important that we lay out the building on the available land,” says Takashi Yamasaki, manager of Daiwa’s Information Systems department. The proposal must also satisfy the landowner’s commitment to contribute to the community; profits are not the sole focus.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/daiwa-house-industry/.

Photo Credit: A three-story apartment complex designed by Daiwa House. Courtesy of Daiwa House Industry.

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Generative Design in Architecture and Construction Will Pave the Way to Productivity

In the new era of generative design in architecture, engineering, and construction, designers and builders will use computers not just to describe buildings, but cocreate them.

Before GPS, if you got lost while driving your car, you had to swallow your pride and stop to ask for directions. With the help of the innate intelligence of Google Maps or Waze, you can let a machine compute the best route so you can concentrate on what’s really important—driving.

In the case of architects, engineers, and contractors, their computers will help navigate the design and construction process, so they can focus on making successful projects and great buildings as a result.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/generative-design-architecture/.

Photo Credit: In the age of generative design, humans and computers manipulate building data to cocreate structures that could not have been conceived or built by traditional methods, such as the acoustic ceiling in the University of Iowa’s Voxman School of Music ...

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UNHCR Site Architects Use Technology to Help Rohingya Refugees in Bangladesh

As Rohingya refugees flood into Bangladesh, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees works tirelessly to provide safe shelter, quickly. In this video, meet site architect Phoebe Goodwin and learn how she uses technology to make the most of the land provided for the settlement. From navigating dramatic land undulations to considering migration patterns of endangered elephants, the challenges of Goodwin’s job are varied, and she explains how she is able to tackle them all through software.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/rohingya-refugees-in-bangladesh/.
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GIS and BIM Integration Will Transform Infrastructure Design and Construction

An unfortunate fact of the AEC (architecture, engineering, and construction) industry is that, between every stage of the process—from planning and design to construction and operations—critical data is lost.

For example, when you move data between phases of the usable lifecycle of a bridge, you end up shuttling that data back and forth between software systems that recognize only their own data sets. The minute you translate that data, you reduce its richness and value. When a project stakeholder needs data from an earlier phase of the process, planners, designers, and engineers often have to manually re-create that information, resulting in unnecessary rework. 

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/gis-and-bim-integration/.

Photo Credit: Merging GIS and BIM data introduces a geospatial element into structure design, which leads to safer and smarter buildings, roads, and transportation.

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“The Great Good Place” Uses Sustainable Innovation to Connect Bangkok Residents

Bangkok, Thailand, is a vibrant metropolis. This colorful capital city, one of the most visited in the world, offers amazing food and culture, tourist-friendly floating markets, golden palaces, great shopping, and booming nightlife. But—as is true of life in other big cities—its residents also deal with issues of social isolation, lack of access to green spaces, and other urban woes.

Magnolia Quality Development Corporation, Ltd. (MQDC), a Thailand-based real-estate developer, recognizes that potential home buyers might want more than just a building complex and created an integrated 17-acre campus called WHIZDOM 101. The venture is called The Great Good Place, after sociologist Ray Oldenburg’s 1989 book, which posits that to live well, a balance between home life, the workplace, and sociable “third places” to build community is crucial. WHIZDOM 101 is a sustainable smart city within a large metropolis designed to help residents lead more efficient, healthier, and more fulfilling lives through innovation and technology.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/sustainable-innovation/.

Photo Credit: Sustainability and community inform Bangkok‘s WHIZDOM 101 housing concept, which integrates work, home, and a common “third place.” Courtesy MQDC.

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