Education

The Future of Education Will Determine the Success of Tomorrow’s Workforce

In the midst of today’s fast-moving, tech-heavy landscape, sit back and ask yourself an important question: How does your degree and formal education impact what you’re doing in your work life?

This question gets to the heart of the immediate need for a foundational shift in how academia and industry operate—and need to cooperate—for the future of education. In a world powered by ubiquitous information, the traditional education model is showing its age. To meet the demands of a new era, lifelong learning needs to be at the center of any professional’s career plan. Education isn’t about majors anymore; it’s about future skilling to keep pace with rapid advances in technology and emerging opportunities across industries.

The days of set disciplines and skills, of hermetically sealed and siloed professions, is over. Today’s workforce, from coders to workers on the new factory floor, needs to be focused on lifetime learning and reskilling, finding ways to adapt to changing professional flows of knowledge.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://redshift.autodesk.com/future-of-education/.

Photo Credit: From grade school to college to the workplace, education is ongoing. Illustration by Micke Tong.

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How Can Leaders Confront the Skills Gap in Manufacturing After COVID-19?

In a 2018 Deloitte/Manufacturing Institute report, 89% of manufacturing CEOs cited a critical shortage of talent as their top concern. The study estimated that 4.6 million manufacturing jobs would need to be filled in the next decade—and 2.4 million jobs might go unfilled due to a lack of trained workers.

US manufacturing has taken a beating during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 486,000 job openings were available in manufacturing in June 2019. That number dropped to 306,000 by May 2020 but had recovered to 336,000 (a 10% rebound) by June. So overall demand is down, but assuming the pandemic’s impact on the US economy is not permanent, the skills gap in manufacturing will persist.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://redshift.autodesk.com/skills-gap-in-manufacturing/.

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Back to School Week: 7 Design-Education Stories for Preschoolers to Postgrads

As parents pack the kids off to school to become productive members of some yet-unknown future society, they trust teachers to connect with students’ minds while adding enough fun to keep the young scholars amused and motivated.

Creative companies and forward-thinking schools and programs are opening up new ways to both educate and engage budding designers and engineers. The college experience is changing as well, as new methods evolve to meet the needs of graduates and the world. Emphasis on tailored learning experiences, sustainability, and real-world applications is coming to the fore.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/back-to-school-week/.
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Lessons Learned: Titan Gilroy’s Plan to Reclaim American Manufacturing

Titan Gilroy is a machinist, businessman, reality-TV star, and now an educator. With accolades like that, it might be surprising to learn that his personal history has more stripes and bars than classrooms and boardrooms.

But Gilroy’s story is no secret: After a successful amateur boxing career and a contract from Top Rank to turn professional, he got into a nightclub fight that led to a 16-year prison sentence. Good behavior earned him an early release, and Gilroy realized that the fight—or the need to fight, even in the boxing ring—was gone. A different, more productive passion was waiting.

His first job out of prison was an entry-level position at a small machining shop, where Gilroy worked overtime, took evening classes, and moved from novice CNC-machine operator to foreman within a year. He excelled in this challenging industry: 10 years and a robust skill set later, he opened his own precision machine shop, Titan America MFG, in Rocklin, California.

This article originally appeared on Autodesk’s Redshift, a site dedicated to inspiring designers, engineers, builders, and makers. Continue reading the article: https://www.autodesk.com/redshift/titan-manufacturing/.

Photo Credit: Courtesy Titans of CNC

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